National Consortium for Graduate Degress for Minorities in Science and Engineering (GEM)

Myneeka Cook became the first GEM-STC Fellow in 2005

Mercedes Merino is pursuing a Ph.D. in Hydrology at the University of Arizona. Sponsoring STC: SAHRA

Kristina Lord graduated from Norfolk State University and is pursuing a Ph.D. in Chemistry at the University of Washington. Sponsoring STC: CMDITR

Seven of the National Science Foundation's Science and Technology Centers have entered into a unique partnership with the National Consortium for Graduate Degrees for Minorities in Science and Engineering (GEM) to offer graduate fellowships (M.S. and Ph.D.) to underrepresented students.

Kristina Lord graduated from Norfolk State University and is pursuing a Ph.D. in Chemistry at the University of Washington. Sponsoring STC: CMDITR Mercedes Merino is pursuing a Ph.D. in Hydrology at the University of Arizona. Sponsoring STC: SAHRAMyneeka Cook became the first GEM-STC Fellow in 2005.

The partnership with GEM-STC creates a direct pipeline for minority candidates to gain research experience and join STC graduate programs to advanced degrees.